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We’ve been working hard to help the abused and neglected youth in our community find safe, permanent homes. Here’s what we’ve been up to lately:

2019 Friend of CASA Award

The Friend of CASA Award was to have been presented in March during our 2020 Reverse Your Luck fundraising gala in Yankton. Because of the outbreak of Covid-19, that fundraiser was cancelled, and along with it we had to postpone the Friend of CASA Award announcement.

We kept waiting for a time when Southeast CASA was having “something special” so that we could incorporate this award presentation. The pandemic put a stop to any large events, so we used the Nov. 12th Open House at our new office location to make the Friend of CASA Award presentation to Janet Stark of ALC Event Design.

“Janet has graciously assisted Southeast CASA with each of its gala events since we began hosting them in 2015. Whenever we asked for her help, she was quick to say “Yes!” Because of Janet’s generosity, not only did our events look first-rate, but Southeast CASA was able to raise more funds to provide CASA advocacy for local children who had been abused or severely neglected. All of our current and past board members join the Southeast CASA staff and volunteers in thanking Janet for her invaluable support for the CASA kids,” Said Sherri Rodgers-Conti during the presentation of the award.

Office Relocation Ribbon Cutting and Open House

Southeast CASA has moved! Our offices are now at 413 W. 15th Street in Yankton.

We celebrated our new office location with an Open House and ribbon cutting on Nov. 12, 2020. The Yankton Chamber of Commerce Ambassadors and some of our board members and agency partners were on hand to see the new office and conduct the ribbon cutting. Thanks to those who attended!

L to R in photo above: Tyler Buckman, Daisey Kamback, Sherri Rodgers-Conti, Jesse Bailey, Kaye O'Neal, Emily Monier, and Sara Livingston.

Our New Yankton Office Location

Southeast CASA is now located at 413 W. 15th Street in Yankton, just west of Mozak's Flooring at 15th and Broadway Ave.

 

2018 Friend of CASA Award

At the 2019 "Reverse Your Luck" fundraising gala, Tom Andera was recognized as the first "Friend of CASA" award recipient. Tom is the owner of Andera Bookkeeping and Tax Services in Yankton. He has been assisting Southeast CASA with its payroll processing since 2011. Because of Tom's invaluable assistance, Southeast CASA is able to help more abused and neglected children in our area. Thanks for all you do for the CASA kids, Tom!

  • First National Bank
    First National Bank

    Major Sponsor of Southeast CASA

  • Yankton Medical Clinic
    Yankton Medical Clinic
  • First National Bank
    First National Bank

    Major sponsor of Southeast CASA

  • Sanford Vermillion
    Sanford Vermillion

    Sponsor of CASA training

  • Wintz & Ray Funeral Home
    Wintz & Ray Funeral Home

    Annual sponsor

  • Vishay
    Vishay

    Annual sponsor

  • Kolberg Pioneer
    Kolberg Pioneer

    Annual sponsor

  • United Way Yankton
    United Way Yankton

    Yankton County agency

  • United Way Vermillion
    United Way Vermillion

    Clay County agency

Why Mentoring Matters for Children

Why Mentoring Matters for Children

Whether it’s in business relationships, personal relationships or school relationships, mentoring plays a valuable role in our community. Becoming a mentor gives you the opportunity to share your knowledge, experience and principles with someone else. This type of relationship often encourages and enables them to grow into someone even more exceptional. If you’ve ever been mentored yourself, you know how beneficial a mentor can be.

So of course, when looking at how adults can serve the children in our community, mentoring comes high on the list. While mentoring a child can be similar to mentoring an adult, it brings with it a whole new level of commitment and benefits. Mentoring a child helps them to see unlimited possibilities for the future, learn something new and most importantly, realize that somebody cares about them. Here’s why mentoring matters for children—and why you should consider getting involved.

1. Mentoring helps learn new things.
When you mentor a child, you can teach them any number of new things, helping to expand their mind and absorb new information. For instance, if you work as a construction worker, you can teach your mentee about construction; or, if you enjoy volunteering at a dance studio, you can show your mentee some of your favorite moves. However, even more than practical skills and knowledge, having a mentor exposes children to new ideas, new thought processes and new ways of life, that they might not have received otherwise from their immediate circle of adults. When children learn new things, they can continue to grow into well-rounded and stable adults themselves.

2. Mentoring gives new experiences.
Just as mentoring helps children learn new things, it also gives new and exciting experiences. This experience could be as simple as going to get ice cream at a local shop, or could be as complicated as making a trip to a different city for an adventure. One study conducted by North Carolina State University shows that youth from disadvantaged backgrounds are twice as likely to attend college when they have a mentor. This can be in part from the experiences they gain through the mentoring process. When children are exposed to a variety of controlled circumstances during their development, they learn confidence, feel connected and will be more likely to search for new experiences as they become adults.

3. Mentoring provides valuable adult relationships.
Oftentimes, the children who need a mentor the most are those who otherwise might not have very stable adult relationships in their lives. These are the children who come from difficult situations, dramatic family backgrounds and struggle in school. Through mentoring, they’re able to experience a stable, valuable adult relationship, perhaps for the first time in their life. Appropriate adult relationships are an incredibly important component in any child’s development. They provide someone the child can look up to, trust and learn from. According to a five year study conducted by Big Brothers Big Sisters Canada, children with mentors were found to be more confident and have fewer behavioral problems than their peers without mentors. Adult relationships matter, and you can provide that for a child.

4. Mentoring shows someone cares.
Finally—and possibly most importantly—mentoring shows that someone cares. Children know their parents are supposed to love them. They understand that even their teachers should care for them in some way. But when they have a separate adult come in and love them appropriately, without any visible “benefit” or “recognition,” they truly feel special. By establishing a mentor relationship with a child, you can change a life through the power of caring. When children know someone out there cares for them, they’re less likely to get in trouble, more likely to focus on getting good grades and more likely to be involved with the community themselves. All of these benefits come from the relational support an adult mentor can provide.

If you want to live an altruistic life and make a valuable impact on your community that will literally last a lifetime, consider mentoring a child. You have the opportunity to make a genuine difference in their life, and you might just be surprised at the benefits you gain, as well.

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